Located at the Heart of the Southern California economy, Chino Airport (CNO) is found in the County of San Bernardino within minutes of Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside counties. It is the largest non-commercial airport with a 20-mile radius in the region making it a leading general aviation airport of choice for independent pilots, students and trainers and corporate users.

Map of Chino Tower area.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Federal Aviation Administration

Chino Tower
7000 Merrill Avenue, Box 2 Building B-195
Chino, CA 91710

Issued: 06/17/2020 1638 (UTC)

Effective: 06/18/2020 1200 (UTC)
Chino Tower

Letter to Airmen: LTA-CNO-5

Subject: Airspace Transitions and Class C Avoidance

Cancellation: 06/17/2022 1200 (UTC)

Extra diligence is necessary when transiting the Chino Airport (CNO) Class D airspace due to the proximity of the Ontario International Airport (ONT) Class C airspace.

Aircraft departing CNO runways 26L/R via a north (right traffic) downwind or aircraft transitioning East/Westbound transitions from the Northside of CNO occasionally make an unexpected maneuver South, off the downwind leg, to remain clear of the portion of ONT Class C airspace adjacent to CNO Class D airspace.  Pilots avoiding this portion of the ONT Class C airspace are crossing the CNO runway 26L/R final approach course, creating traffic conflictions with landing aircraft.

CNO Tower has an agreement with Southern California TRACON to utilize the ONT Class C airspace, 2500′ MSL and below, within the highlighted portion of the attached graphic.  Pilots in communication with CNO Tower are authorized to transition the ONT Class C airspace within the highlighted area.  Riverside Drive is the visual boundary between ONT Class C Airspace and CNO Class D Airspace.  Pilots should remain South of Riverside Drive while in communication with CNO ATCT transiting Eastbound.

The graphic above illustrates the specific area of airspace ONT Tower has granted to CNO Tower for transitioning aircraft that are in communication with CNO Tower. 

CNO Tower strongly recommends all aviators departing CNO runways 26L/R on a right downwind departure or transitioning eastbound, to remain on course and in communication with the CNO tower until advised.

When CNO tower is closed, the agreement between CNO tower and Southern California TRACON (SCT) is NOT in effect. Aircraft intending to make a right downwind departure when CNO tower is closed are required to remain outside of the ONT Class C airspace.  For transition through ONT Class C airspace, aviators are required to contact SCT to coordinate their transition request.

Brian Childers
Air Traffic Manager, Chino Tower

Airport Address

  • 7000 Merrill Ave., Chino, CA 91710
  • Phone: (909) 465-5201

Important Numbers

  • Chino Police Department
    (909) 628-1234
  • Chino Valley Ind. Fire District
    Dispatch: (909) 902-5260
    Non-emergency dispatch: (909) 983-5911
Chino Airport Business Directory (by category)
  • Encore
    (909) 597-6566
  • Mach One
    (909) 597-8461
  • Threshold
    (909) 606-6164

Vinny’s
(310) 780-5455
www.flymidfield.net/Home.html

  • Encore
    (909) 597-6566
  • Flying Tigers Aviation
    (909)606-3300
  • Threshold
    (909) 606-6164

Chino Aircraft Interiors
(909) 393-5814

  • Aero Trader
    (909) 597-4020
  • Cabe’s Aviation
    (909) 597-6166
  • Chino Aviation
    (909) 543-7047
  • DeBritton Aviation, LTD.
    (714) 316-6009 
  • Fighter Rebuilders
    (909) 393-8403
  • Inland Valley Aviation
    (909) 597-1904
  • Navion Customs
    (909) 597-5360
  • Threshold Technologies
    (909) 606-6164

Century Aircraft Painting
(909) 393-3550

DeBritton Aviation, LTD.
(714) 316-6009

  • Advantage Aviation
    (909) 606-0220
  • Affordable Avionics
    (909) 606-9876

Tom King Aerial Ent.
(800) 995-5464

CNO-ATCT
(909) 597-1703

  • Alliance Int’l Aviation
    (909) 606-0747
  • DuBois Aviation
    (909) 597-6292
  • K-M Air
    (909) 393-7270
  • Kazuaki Yanagida
    (909) 597-2018
  • Alliance Int’l Aviation
    (909) 606-0747
  • DuBois Aviation
    (909) 597-6292
  • A-240 Partners
    (951) 372-9555
  • Chino Airport
    (909) 597-3910
  • Chino Airport B110 & B210
    (951) 894-2431 
  • Chino Dev. Group
    (909) 597-5804
  • Chino Dev. League
    (909) 620-5203
  • Flying Tigers Aviation
    (909) 606-0100
  • Lancair, Inc
    (619) 671-9222
  • Pioneer Airport, LLC
    (949) 789-4555
  • Southwest Airport Dev
    (909) 597-7244
  • Planes of Fame Air Museum
    (909) 597-3277
  • Yanks Air Museum
    (909) 597-1735
  • Alliance Int’l Aviation
    (909) 606-0747
  • Flying Tigers Aviation
    (909) 606-3300

Flo’s Airport Café
(909) 597-3416

Airport at a Glance

Visitor Points of Interests

Photograph of an airplane outside hangars at the Cal-Aero Flight Academy, [s.d.], possibly World War II era (later, the Chino Airport). A small bi-plane can be seen at center, while hangars can be seen at left and at right. A sign reading, "Cal-Aero Flight Academy" can be seen above the doors on the hangars. A man can be seen standing to the left of the hangar at right, while four parked automobiles can be seen to the right of the left-most hangar. Bushes, an American flag, buildings, and an open field can be seen in the background. "Stop" can be seen painted upside-down on the concrete in the foreground.

About Chino Airport

Located in southwest San Bernardino County, central to Los Angeles and Orange counties, Chino Airport (CNO) is a general aviation airport of choice for private owners, corporate users, instructors and aviation enthusiasts.

History of Chino Airport

Chino Airport has a rich legacy in the history of aviation in the United States. Originally known as ‘Cal-Aero Field,’ Chino Airport was home to the Cal-Aero Flight Academy, an independent flying school for military pilots in the early 1940s. Cal-Aero Flight Academy contracted with the Army Air Forces to be one of its flight training bases for World War II Army Air Cadets. At one time the school numbered 700 cadets and 200 planes, including Stearmans, BT-13s, T- 6s and B-24s.

On October 16, 1944, Cal-Aero Flight Academy officially closed its doors having provided the United States Military with more than 10,365 fighter and bomber pilots during World War II.

Photograph above of an airplane outside hangars at the Cal-Aero Flight Academy, possibly during the WWII era at what is today known as Chino Airport. Photo courtesy of University of Southern California. Libraries and California Historical Society

This historic period demonstrated the strategic role of warplanes and the bravery of the pilots who flew them. After the war, hundreds of former combat aircraft were flown into Chino for disposal, many of which have since been restored.

Cal-Aero’s legacy remains important to Chino Airport and the companies that reside on the property. The name Cal-Aero is still preserved at the airport and can be seen on several buildings.

Today, Chino Airport has transformed from a historic wartime training center into a burgeoning economic engine for the Southern California region. Operated by the County of San Bernardino, Chino Airport is home to numerous aviation related companies, including three full-service fixed base operations, maintenance, aircraft management, charters, full-service aircraft interior and refurbishment centers, flight training and restoration. It is recognized as one of the leading centers of aircraft restoration and preservation with numerous companies actively providing these services at the airport. Through its general aviation services, the airport drives significant economic benefit throughout the local community, providing jobs, producing income and influencing regional spending.

Chino Airport is also home to two historic aircraft museums, Planes of Fame Air Museum and Yanks Air Museum, which house nearly 300 warbirds and vintage aircraft combined. While most museums are content to house relics of the past, Planes of Fame Air Museum and Yanks Air Museum put aircraft in their natural element, creating a living history of yesteryear.